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Update on the 2015 Legislative Session

 

Guest Blogger: Don Weisman, Hawaii Government Relations Director

AHA Priority Bills Still On Track As State Legislative Session Nears Half-Way Mark

Two of the American Heart Association’s priority bills were on track toward final passage into law as the Hawaii State Legislature neared the half-way point in its 2015 session: newborn heart screening and stroke data registry. 

(HB 467/SB 337) Newborn Heart Screening

HB 467/SSB 337 would require all newborns to be screened for critical congenital heart defects (CCHD) prior to discharge from their birthing center. One of the best ways to detect CCHD is through a simple, noninvasive, inexpensive test, called pulse oximetry, or pulse ox. The pulse ox test consists of sensors placed on a baby's hand and/or foot to check blood oxygen levels. It is a simple bedside test to determine the amount of oxygen in a baby's blood and the baby's pulse rate. Low levels of oxygen in the blood can be a sign of a CCHD. The test is painless and takes only a few minutes. If the baby’s levels are too low, additional tests may be conducted and advanced treatments pursued.

Congenital heart defects are the most common birth defect in the U.S. and the leading killer of infants with birth defects. Babies discharged from a birthing center without having a congenital heart defect diagnosed are at risk for having serious problems, or even death, within the first few days or weeks of life.

(HB 589) Stroke Data Registry

(HB 589) would establish a state stroke data registry. The bill passed its hearings in the House and was expected to pass a House floor vote before moving to the Senate for consideration. Establishment of a stroke registry in Hawaii could help illuminate weaknesses that exist in the state’s stroke system of care.

For example, data collected in a stroke registry may show poor patient education about stroke symptoms, geographical differences in the quality of stroke care received, problems with adherence to stroke treatment guidelines, or the need to improve pre-hospital stroke response or treatment by our county EMS agencies. The data could then catalyze Hawaii’s stroke stakeholders to find solutions to the challenges encountered.

Under the bill, all hospitals treating stroke patients would be required to use the AHA’s Get With The Guidelines-Stroke quality improvement tool to collect and share patient stroke data with the State Department of Health which would then work with the State Stroke Task Force, a coalition of representatives from stroke hospitals, EMS agencies, the Department of Health and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association to assess the de-identified data and make recommendations to improve the state’s stroke system of care. Stroke is Hawaii’s third leading cause of death and a leading cause of disability.

Stay tuned for further action alerts to support these bills as they continue through the legislative process.

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