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Many Americans afraid to perform CPR

CPR can double or even triple a person's chances of survival from sudden cardiac arrest.  Yet, only half of Americans can be counted on to perform CPR in an emergency, a new survey finds.

Even more – 61 percent – worry they could unintentionally injure the victim. Longtime CPR instructor Gustavo E. Flores, M.D., said the findings didn’t surprise him because he’s heard the same concerns and comments from students. But he wants people to know the benefits of CPR greatly outweigh the risk of injury.

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Each year in the United States, more than 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside a hospital, and only about 11 percent of those treated by emergency medical services survive, according to AHA statistics. CPR can double or triple a person’s chance of survival, especially if performed within the first few minutes of cardiac arrest. For more on this story, CLICK HERE.  

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