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Coronavirus and Heart Health

No matter who you are or where you are, the American Heart Association is here to help you through these times. We’re providing trusted, science-based tools and resources to empower you to take charge of your health and well-being. Our website, www.heart.org, is a good place to start for the most up-to-date information.

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We are grateful for the millions of people, like you, who have worked with us relentlessly to build healthier communities for everyone, everywhere. In this new reality, there will be new challenges for all of us as we press forward together to achieve our mission.

We are with you.

We are here to help you and your family eat healthy, stay active and stay well during this challenging time. To that end, we’re committed to being there for you:

• We are helping parents, students and workplaces understand how to minimize risk when out and about, stay active, eat healthy and be well when at home, and how people with cardiovascular conditions may be at increased risk.

• At the American Heart Association, we are investing our research dollars in the search for answers. We are fast-tracking a special $2.5 million fund for rapid response scientific research projects to investigate the specific cardiovascular implications of coronavirus, with a goal of developing more effective treatments quickly – potentially within the next 6-8 months.

• You can also be assured that we are working diligently to provide reliable, science-based information for the approximately 120 million people in the United States who currently have one or more cardiovascular conditions and who already may be at higher risk for COVID-19 complications. Based on current information, it appears elderly people with coronary heart disease or hypertension are more likely to be infected and to develop more severe symptoms. Stroke survivors may face increased risk for complications if they become infected with COVID-19. While public health experts tell us the overall risk of getting this virus is currently low, the situation is rapidly evolving, and scientists are learning more every day.

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