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Can You Save the Person You Love?

Imagine this scenario: you’re at home with your spouse when suddenly they fall to the ground. Would you know what to do, what to look for, how to help?

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Of course, you’d call 911, but there is something else that is crucial to survival: CPR.   For Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) victims, every second that passes without intervention heart muscle dies and CPR is the one thing that you could do to give your loved one the best chance at survival. 

We live in a place where the closest ambulance may be 30 minutes or more away.  When ordinary people, not just doctors and EMS, know CPR, a victim’s survival rate can double, or even triple. That is why the American Heart Association believes it is so important to make sure as many people know CPR as possible.

During the 2017 legislative session the AHA worked with lawmakers to increase the number of people who know the potentially life-saving skill of CPR. On April 13, Montana Senate Bill 135 was passed. The bill encourages school districts to provide programs to teach First Aid, CPR, and how to use an Automated External Defibrillator (AED) machine. The goal is to train all high school graduates in CPR so that thousands of rescuers will be added to the population each year. 

On July 6th more than a dozen kids at the Boys and Girls Club of the Flathead Reservation and Lake County learned CPR during a two-day emergency skills workshop.  They were asked to imagine the mannequins as people to help them get into the moment of a real life saving situation. The Boys and Girls Club members learned to check the patient for a response, and call 911. The instructors taught them how to do chest compressions and breathe into the patient’s lungs. They also learned how to use an AED.

To read more about this training click here to read the entire story on the Valley Journal’s website. 

Cardiac Arrest is a leading cause of death in the U.S., and many victims appear healthy with no known heart disease or other risk factors.  In fact, 4 out of 5 cardiac arrests happen at home. If called on to administer CPR in an emergency, the life you save is likely to be someone you love: a child, a spouse, a parent or a friend.  If you don’t know the basics of CPR, please consider taking a CPR course or consider getting a CPR Anytime Kit. Learning CPR may save the one you love!

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