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An AHA Program That May Save Your Life in Montana

Amanda Cahill, Montana AHA Government Relations Director

Over the last four years a coalition, led by AHA Director Joani Hope, has come together to work on better medical care for victims of heart attack. The project, called Mission: Lifeline Montana has improved the chance that you will survive a heart attack.  

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By working with doctors, nurses, paramedics, and others around the state we have been able to streamline the care given to heart attack patients.

How did we do it? The short answer is with a lot of help from volunteers; state representatives from the Department of Health, nurses, doctors, paramedics, EMTs, and countless others have dedicated their time to this important initiative. 

More than $2M was given in new equipment to fire and ambulance services across MT. Additionally, free education and training has been provided in nearly every hospital and EMS agency.  This education outlines the right steps to take when someone is experiencing chest pain.  Public education was also a part of the project with ads and billboards encouraging anyone experiencing chest pain to call 9-1-1 immediately.  Often in MT we believe that driving ourselves to the hospital is the quickest and safest idea.   However, when 9-1-1 is called it activates a much faster system where those with chest pain are seen quicker once they arrive at the hospital.  Because heart attacks kill muscle every minute, it is crucial that patients are treated in a timely manner. 

To hear more about this life-saving project, contact Amanda Cahill; amanda.cahill@heart.org

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